29th April

Ireland-Wales project to investigate climate change and coastal heritage

A five-year project stretching from Ireland's east to south coast and along the Welsh coastline will use ‘cutting-edge’ technology to analyse coastal and island archaeology and heritage sites most affected by climate change, coastal erosion, storminess and rising sea levels.

CHERISH Skelligs

A bird's eye view of Little Skellig from Skellig Michael - one of selected sites  

CHERISH (Climate, Heritage and Environments of Reefs, Islands and Headlines) will be led by the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales, with partners Aberystwyth University, Geological Survey Ireland and the Discovery Programme Centre for Archaeology and Innovation Ireland Centre for Archaeology and Innovation Ireland.

Hydrography; geology; archaeology; built and maritime heritage; remote sensing and environmental science will be employed in the research that will focus on selected headlands and sites including the Saltee Islands Glascarrig Motte (Co Wexford); Skellig Michael (Co Kerry) and the Skerries Islands (Co Dublin), and islands around Pembrokeshire, Cardigan Bay and the Llŷn Peninsula of Wales,

Read more: Ireland-Wales project to investigate climate change and coastal heritage

Hard engineering is not the only answer to managing flood risk

An ecosystem-based approach to managing flood waters that is proving effective across Europe has yet to be accepted in Ireland where policy-makers appear to favour hard engineering as the answer to this growing problem – a new report has found.

Craughwell flooding December 2015

Craughwell, Co Galway, December 2015                                                                 Photo John Conaghan 

Natural Flood Management – Adopting ecosystem approaches to managing flood risk – by environmental policy analyst and broadcaster, Anja Murray, and commissioned by Friends of the Earth, finds that soft engineering - a whole catchment approach to managing soil, wetlands, woodlands and flood plains – can be highly effective by slowing down the flow of water on a catchment wide scale and reducing flood risk.

Read more: Hard engineering is not the only answer to managing flood risk

Major investment to safeguard Ireland's inland fisheries resource

Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Fisheries Protection 2016 Review highlights the results of protection work undertaken on the country’s freshwater fisheries resource which contributes €836m annually to the economy.

IFI angling

Fisheries Inspector Lorraine O’Donnell, Dr Ciaran Byrne, chief executive IFI; Minister Sean Kyne and Fisheries Inspector Michael Hennessy

Launching the Review, Sean Kyne, Minister for Gaeltacht Affairs and Natural Resources, commended IFI personnel for their dedicated efforts in protecting Ireland's "invaluable" inland fisheries resource.

Read more: Major investment to safeguard Ireland's inland fisheries resource

Seventy-three Irish rivers open for salmon angling in 2017

Regulations and by-laws to govern wild salmon and sea trout fisheries in 2017 came into effect on January 1. Inland Fisheries Ireland will also carry out a full review of the 'catch and release' element of fisheries management policy ahead of the 2018 season.

Drowse Fishery

Fly fishing for spring salmon, grilse, gillaroo trout on the River Drowse and Lough Melvin

"In all, 73 rivers will be open for angling activity in 2017, and this will provide opportunities for all to share  this important natural resource on a sustainable basis," remarked Sean Kyne, Ministeer of State at the Department of Communications, Climate Action and Environment.

Read more: Seventy-three Irish rivers open for salmon angling in 2017

Waterways Ireland 2017 Event Programme

Waterways Ireland has opened a call for 'sustainable events and activities' in 2017, in waterways and waterside communities.

Waterways Ireland 2017 grant aid

For the past eleven years, the organisation has supported communities nationwide with activities including angling; canoeing; rowing; sailing and power sports; arts; history; drama; new skills.

Read more: Waterways Ireland 2017 Event Programme

Fracking for shale gas poses a serious threat to the water environment

Sinead O'Brien Network Coordinator at Sustainable Water Network (SWAN)

With a climate change denier and ardent supporter of the fossil fuel industry elected as US President, the environmental threats posed by exploitation of oil and gas have come into sharp focus.SWAN wetlands

Fracking for shale gas poses a serious threat to the water environment

Potentially viable reserves of shale gas in Ireland, for which exploration licences have been granted, mean that these threats are not only related to global climate change. Shale gas extraction poses a significant potential risk to the local environment, especially in the licensed areas of Leitrim, Sligo, Cavan and Clare.

Read more: Fracking for shale gas poses a serious threat to the water environment

Spread the News

Ireland-Wales project to investigate climate chang...

A five-year project stretching from Ireland's east to south coast and along the Welsh coastline will [ ... ]

Hard engineering is not the only answer to managin...

An ecosystem-based approach to managing flood waters that is proving effective across Europe has yet [ ... ]

Major investment to safeguard Ireland's inland fis...

Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Fisheries Protection 2016 Review highlights the results of pro [ ... ]

Seventy-three Irish rivers open for salmon angling...

Regulations and by-laws to govern wild salmon and sea trout fisheries in 2017 came into effect on Ja [ ... ]

Ireland-Wales project to investigate climate change and coastal heritage
Hard engineering is not the only answer to managing flood risk
Major investment to safeguard Ireland's inland fisheries resource
Seventy-three Irish rivers open for salmon angling in 2017