17th December

Acadian Seaplants enters Ireland's seaweed sector

When it was confirmed in May that Údarás na Gaeltachta had sold its shares in the seaweed processing company Arramara Teoranta to Acadian Seaplants Limited of Canada, the news was greeted with concern by some harvesters fearing that their generations-old livelihood of hand-harvesting would be sidelined in favour of mechanisation.

Acadian seawweed

In an exclusive interview, Inshore Ireland talked to Acadian Seaplants President Jean-Paul Deveau who says he looks forward to working with harvesters and Arramara’s employees, suppliers and customers to sustainably grow and develop the company and the industry to their full potential.

Read more: Acadian Seaplants enters Ireland's seaweed sector

Why is a publicly-funded document not available in Ireland?

Inshore Ireland masthead

Our lead story outlines the frustration experienced by a representative of an aquaculture producer organisation trying to obtain from an official source in Ireland a copy of the final complete report of the SUMBAWS Project (SUstainable Management of interactions Between Aquaculture and Wild Salmonid fish).

SUMBAWS – by all accounts is a significant report and had a working budget of just over €2.3 million and cost EU tax payers more than €1.5 million.

Read more: Why is a publicly-funded document not available in Ireland?

Publicly-funded report unavailable from official sources in Ireland

Inshore Ireland’s December lead story asks why the official report of a major EU-backed scientific project, believed to include detailed analysis of the impact of sea lice on wild salmon and sea trout, is not readily available in Ireland.

SUMBAWS report

Why is this publicly-funded report not available in Ireland?

The SUMBAWS Project (SUstainable Management of interactions Between Aquaculture and Wild Salmonid fish) studied the impact of sea lice on wild populations of salmon and sea trout, and details the results of experiments by fisheries biologists in Ireland, Scotland, Netherlands and Norway.

Read more: Publicly-funded report unavailable from official sources in Ireland

Traditional seaweed harvesters fear introdution of compulsory licensing

Údarás na Gaeltachta’s decison in March to sell its shares in seaweed processor Arramara Teoranta to Acadian Seaplants Limited of Canada has led to disquiet among traditional harvesters who fear that compulsory licensing is about to be introduced. 

The December issue of Inshore Ireland (13/12) includes an exclusive interview with Jean-Paul Deveau, President of Acadian Seaplants Limited.

Acadian - seawweed

Abundant supplies of seaweed on Ireland's west coast

Responding to Inshore Ireland's question on licensing, Mr Deveau said that Arramara Teo never held a licence to harvest seaweed and has always relied on harvesters to supply the factory. He said that would continue to be the case under the new owners.

Read more: Traditional seaweed harvesters fear introdution of compulsory licensing

Seaweed - Ireland's newest farming activity

Seaweed farming offers Ireland the opportunity to become a producer of one of the EU's fastest growing food categories that by 2020 could boost Irish seafood sales by an additional €10 million per year.

This was a key message delivered to close on 200 delegates attending the BIM hosted conference Farmed Irish Seaweed: An Ocean Wonder Food? as the Agency's first report on Irish seaweed farming was unveiled.

8.3aquaculture seaweed

About one quarter of EU seaweed suipply is produced in France and Spain

Findings from The European Market for Sea Vegetables - a study specially commissioned for the conference - show Ireland targeting 2,000 metric tonnes (harvest weight) per annum of seaweed, farmed for human consumption.

Read more: Seaweed - Ireland's newest farming activity

Ireland has no case to answer in sea lice complaint says EU Commission

A five-year Pilot Investigation by the European Commission into the potential impact of sea lice on wild salmon stocks in Ireland has concluded with the finding that the Irish State has no case to answer.

The investigation was launched in 2009 following complaints by Salmon Watch Ireland and Friends of the Irish Environment (FIE). The case was initially closed in 2012 but was reopened later that year after FIE provided the Commission with additional information, including a report from Inland Fisheries Ireland.

Salmon-Cage

EU Commission report into the potential impact of sea lice on wild salmon stocks in Ireland states that Ireland has no case to answer

Since its introduction in April 2008, the EU Pilot has been a relatively quick and effective mechanism designed to provide answers to questions arising in the application of EU laws – particularly those raised by citizens or businesses.

Read more: Ireland has no case to answer in sea lice complaint says EU Commission

Spread the News

Shellfish producers slam level of sewage discharge
Sea trout collapse: a complicated issue
Irish shellfish safety reporting goes live
Increase in Irish aquaculture production